Aether Arts 420: Boho Chic edp. (Amber Jobin 2017)

 

Originally published on cafleurebon.com  14 April 2017

 

New Perfume Review: Aether Arts Perfume, Perfume 420: Boho Chic Perfume Oil
(Amber Jobin 2017)
“Colored cottons hang in air
Charming cobras in the square
Striped Djellabas we can wear at home
Don’t you know we’re riding on the Marrakesh Express
They’re taking me to Marrakesh…”
-Crosby, Stills, & Nash; Marrakesh Express 1969

Created just in time for 4/20 Amber Jobin gives us a cannibis-inspired scent as an homage to the hippie jet-set of the early 1970’s discovery of Marrakech with it’s aura of easy-living and long languid days and nights devoted to intoxication of some kind. It was a heady time, ripe with possibility, and the cannibis and hashish that was easily available became the stepping stone for vivid imaginative dreams and blissed-out flights of fancy…..
The term 420 (spoken as four-twenty) is a bit more mundane than that, having originated in 1971 behind the high school in San Rafael, CA, then the hub city of Marin County just north of San Francisco. A group of friends coined the term “420” as a shorthand communication for “Meet us out back at 4:20p.m. and let’s smoke some weed”. As it so happened, just a block away from San Rafael High was a small music studio being used by The Grateful Dead for rehearsals, and the friends would hang out at the studio to get stoned and listen to the music. The Term 420 was picked up by Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh, and the rest as they say, is history.

At the same time, on the other side of the planet, global nomads and hipsters, clutching their copies of Paul Bowles’ The Sheltering Sky, were flocking to Marrakech in Morocco following the unmistakable lure of the unknown, or “the other”. Food and lodging were cheap, marijuana and hashish were plentiful, and the sun shined daily. These travelers, many in their late teens and twenties, adopted and embellished local Moroccan dress; the young ladies resplendent in vivid patterned and embroidered Kaftans and bangled head scarves, and the young men in billowing harem pants and bare-chested but for a mirrored cloth vest. Sexuality was fluid, the locals were non-plussed, and the hookahs and joints full of cannibis or hashish ironed out all the harsh edges and glaring realities”.

The warm Moroccan nights were rife with the scent of jasmine flowering vines, and magnolia trees loaded down with blossoms, their combined scents adding to the Aladdin’s lamp narcotic haze blanketing the city. As chef Anthony Bourdain described it “It was a station-of-the-cross for the bad boys of culture.”

420: Boho Chic Perfume Oil is the intriguing and photorealistic scent of this seminal early 70’s time and place. The burning and bitter hashish in the water pipe, the smell of the Medina tanneries juxtaposed on top of the goatish sweaty-wool aroma of the pillows used for reclining in the courtyard of a café or riyadh.The sweet and slightly indolic florals of a semi-arid oasis, a historical traveler-friendly caravansary caught between the turquoise blue and blinding tawny coastline of the Mediterranean, and the vast dry inhospitable desert to the south. The camel, donkey, and oxen sweat, the smells all intertwined and seeming to create an almost fugue state and psychedelic boots-on-the-ground experience, where you could forget your past and recreate yourself as your perfect near-eastern fantasy. It is quite honestly an astonishing and intoxicating scent!

Notes: Green cannabis accord laced with hashish, smoke, ash, jasmine sambac, magnolia, saffron, suede and leather accord, civet, musk, castoreum, costus.

Disclosure: Many thanks to Aether Arts Perfumes for supplying the sample. The opinions are my own
.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s